Finding Your Sweet Spot

So miss-I-don’t-watch-tv just watched about ten straight episodes of How I Met Your Mother. I needed to laugh aloud–it felt so good.

Then I just started numbing out and really not even laughing anymore.

I hit a point at which I could no longer engage. I couldn’t disengage either. (Damn netflix!)

Okay, bless netflix, but how did this happen? There I lay, a TV zombie. I looked in the mirror and my eyes look liked I had just worked a 36 hour shift at a county hospital. This can’t be healthy.

 Where’s the boundary? Healthy release and laughter is fun, but feeling like I just dipped into an alternate reality that zapped me is not.

I guess this is the case with everything in life: there’s a sweet spot. A level of engagement that is healthy and serving, past which it’s unhealthy and a disservice to ourselves.

Now that I think about it, it’s that way with people, food, work, anything. And the sweet spot is a relative concept–it’s different for each of us.

Only you can know what your sweet spot is on any given energetic input. You just have to listen to that little voice inside.

It’s also a dynamic concept. My sweet spot for yoga, writing, time with my kids is different day to day.

So why do we expect ourselves to be able to take in the same amount of anything everyday? Why aren’t we taught to check in with ourselves and feel what our sweet spot for anything is? For example “Today, I can handle very much of my garden, very little of my husband, about an hour of writing, and not too much driving.” And then, adjust our daily decisions to match our sweet spots, and thereby optimize our experience of that day.

Oh yeah, social obligation.

Plans are made, commitments must be stuck to, and things need to get done. Then we prioritize these external factors and find ourselves needing to create “healthy boundaries.” If we honored our sweet spots, we would inherently be maintaining healthy boundaries (and inherently maintaining doshic balance). Our internal sense of limits naturally guides us to energetic balance, and thus health.

Well, we’ll all die with things still needing to be done. And isn’t the most important commitment you make the one to your joy/health (synonymous in many ways).

What do you think? Or rather, what do you feel?  (Please share in the comments below!)

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